Some (Really!) Fun Facts About Me

I began studying dance when I was three and continued through college.


I am a founding editor of WONDERLUST, a new luxury travel site (


I fell in love with Alice in Wonderland as a child and became an avid collector at an early age. The collection was the only box that didn’t arrive in a shipment from graduate school back to Boston, but the one thing I still have are playing cards released when the book came out in 1865.


I found out you could actually study to become a Nonsense Scholar (look it up — it’s a real thing!) and spent years studying and writing puzzles, riddles and silly poems.


I wrote my first play when I was in the sixth grade, a monstrosity of a horror/thriller for the stage called The Janitor, about a bunch of junior high school students who get stuck in school overnight and end up chopped to bits by—you guessed it!—the demented maintenance engineer. It took me two years to finish.


I thought it was a masterpiece.


I was 5’9” by the time I was twelve, and started modeling with Boston’s Chute Agency, a top agency at the time. I did print ads and commercials, but by the time I was fifteen I was a seasoned runway model who worked pretty consistently. I modeled until I was about twenty-two, constantly surprised by how senselessly ruthless models were to one another.


When I was sixteen, Ford Models’ Eileen Ford came to Boston to recruit eight girls to come live with her — I was her last appointment of the day. My first question to her was: “Will this opportunity affect my chances to go to college?” Her answer: “You wouldn’t be able to go.” I told her: “Forget it then. I know I want to go to school.”


And that was that. I stayed for about an hour and she gave me advice on how to get a sponsor for my Junior Prom, and made me promise to write her often, which I did. I still have her letters.


Instead I joined a new NYC agency called NEXT (Karlie Kloss, Sukie Waterhouse), which was willing to work with my school schedule.


I took a job in a bookstore because I heard you could get free books. I ritualistically re-read The Maltese Falcon every year.


When I was on modeling jobs I would always get reprimanded for asking the photographers about their equipment — I wanted to be the photographer, not the model.


In graduate school at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale I was awarded a prestigious campus-wide thesis/dissertation award. My advisor and mentor at the time actually advised me not to apply because “other students might need it more” than me. I applied anyway and won.


I know every single word to Arlo Guthrie’s “Alice’s Restaurant Massacre” — all 18:37 minutes of it.


When I first got to NYC I worked several dead-end jobs, did local commercials, and even got cast in an independent film with Fay Wray of King Kong fame. Sadly, the movie never got made due to Wray’s failing health. I didn’t really care about being in the film, but I really wanted the experience of working with her.


In 2001 I started teaching a playwriting workshop in Manhattan. Several of my students went on to pen long-running Off-Broadway shows.


Health and fitness is a big part of my life. I practice yoga twice a day, adhere to a (mostly) plant-based diet, and study transcendental meditation.


I’ve always be interested in art and design (and studied at Mass College of Art in high school), but when I worked for famed architect Philip Johnson in 2002, I only vaguely knew who he was. He and I bonded over our love of fashion. He gave his employees prototypes from the Four Seasons restaurant’s famous dishware, which I still have.


I am a reiki practitioner and specialize in working with animals.


My favorite interview I ever did was with Ann-Margret, who sang “Happy Birthday” to me at the end.


I’ve written a best-selling bookazine about Led Zeppelin, and another on vinyl collecting. If I could go back in time, I’d be a rock writer in the ‘60s and ‘70s. 


The photo above was taken in the vestibule of Boston's Trinity Church in Copley Square. I am fifteen years old.